Marvel Masterworks: X-Men Volume 1

Marvel Masterworks: X-Men Vol. 1

Marvel Masterworks: X-Men, Volume 1 is a mixed bag. Jack Kirby’s art is wonderful. The writing is okay, the caveat being that the same two storylines are repeated ad nauseum in the first ten issues. For those not in the know the X-Men are mutants, aka Homo Superior. Their genes give them miraculous powers, which is good. What’s not so good is that plain old humans, Homo Sapiens, hate and fear them. The X-Men are led by benevolent telepath Charles Xavier, who is dedicated to protecting humankind from existential threats and also evil mutants. It’s interesting that Xavier works to protect humanity rather than his own kind, a paradigm that changes later.

The evil mutants are led by Magneto, who in this volume is a Dr. Doom clone. Magneto believes that human beings are scum. He’s assembled a group of mutants, aka The Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, to conquer humanity. Later, Magneto and Charles Xavier become two sides of the same coin, but here they are oil and water.

There are two storylines. In the first, Xavier discovers the existence of a new mutant. He sends his X-Men to recruit this new mutant, but the mutant always turns out to be evil. See: The Vanisher, The Blob, The Sub-Mariner, Unus the Untouchable. In the second, the X-Men fight Magneto and his band of evil mutants, as they try to a. conquer the earth; b. recruit mutants to their cause. Both Xavier and Magneto are terrible at recruiting mutants, Magneto because he’s a homicidal maniac, Xavier because he’s creepy. Would you want a teacher who could read your mind? At least with Magneto, you get to hang out in his cool lairs, asteroids and islands with big magnet skyscrapers.

Reading this volume gave me the impression that the creative team was in a state of perpetual deadline Hell. It’s not that the stories are bad, but reading the same two plots gets repetitive. One of the better issues is the introduction of Ka-Zar and the Savage Land, because it probably started life as a ten-second pitch session (Tarzan in Arthur Conan Doyle’s Lost World!) that gained legs. 

Marvel Masterworks: X-Men is worth a read, because it’s Jack Kirby and also because it introduces a number of iconic characters in Marvel history, even if we don’t see a lot of these characters nowadays. These are the issues that laid the groundwork for some classic stories. 

X-Men: Volume One

X-Men: Volume One

X-Men: Volume 1 features the first six issues of the newest reboot of The X-Men. This volume acts as setup for upcoming storylines: the X-Men skirmish with Orchis, a band of human scientists who want to exterminate the mutant menace; the sentient mutant isle of Krakoa reunites with his better half; a quartet of octogenarian botanists hack Krakoa; and The Vault opens.

To say this book features an ensemble cast is an understatement, but the main character seems to be Cyclops. Cyclops lives on the moon with his partner Jean Grey; his brothers, Alex (Havok) and Gabriel (Vulcan); his two children, Nathan (Cable) and Rachel Summers (???); and Wolverine, who is either Jean Grey’s sidepiece or the third party in a polyamorous relationship. Cyclops seems to be the p-o-v character mainly because he’s a good guy who doesn’t consider himself to be a god and doesn’t hate humans.

Speaking of hating humans…Charles Xavier, Magneto, and Apocalypse attend the World Economic Forum, where Magneto tells the pesky human leaders exactly how the newly formed mutant nation intends to conquer the earth by economic means. I guess it beats sinking nuclear submarines. Still, this a bizarre scene, made more so by Xavier’s silence. Marvel has a long tradition of villains with heroic (or at least sympathetic qualities), but Magneto is in a class by himself. He’s a mass-murderer, but the mindset of the new X-Men seems to be ‘fight fire with fire.’

Oh, and apparently there was an assassination attempt on Xavier, but that’s not in this volume. I have no idea which volume it is in, which is annoying. At the moment, there are four or five X-titles, which is Marvel’s way of milking their fans for all they’re worth. None of which is the creative team’s fault, btw.

We learn what Mystique was doing when the X-Men stormed the Orchis Forge and destroyed the Master Mold. She planted a flower of Krakoa in the garden, which gives her the ability to travel to the Forge at will. There she discovers that Nimrod the Master Sentinel isn’t dead after all, but is being constructed by a female scientist.

Magneto and Xavier, who are using Mystique’s dead wife (Destiny) as leverage, want her to kill the scientist, yet another sign that the X-Men are fatally compromised. They also have no intention of resurrecting Destiny. If I’m reading the tea leaves correctly, it looks like this iteration of the X-Men will fail on a truly grand scale.

One of the interesting things about X-Men: Volume 1 is how good people – or people who used to be good – make stupid mistakes. Definitely worth a read.

Daredevil: End of Days

Daredevil: End of Days

WARNING: contains spoilers.

The plot of Daredevil: End of Days is simple. Years in the future Matt Murdock, aka Daredevil, is killed in a brawl with his archenemy Bullseye. Before he dies, he says ‘Mapone’ to Bullseye. Perhaps Murdock says this because of the beating he’s taken from Bullseye, or the brain damage he’s undoubtedly suffering from, or it could mean something else. Nobody cares but Daredevil, Bullseye, and beat reporter Ben Urich. This is a potential problem, because I didn’t care what Mapone means either. What made Matt Murdock lose his sanity is a lot more interesting, in a car crash sort of way.

Urich is a strange choice for a narrator. He has a compulsion to know what happened, all the while understanding that the picture he paints won’t be pretty. He’s the picture-perfect portrait of the grizzled beat reporter, so much so that a cynic might say that he’s a parody of himself, especially when he does things like standing in a downpour (because it’s always either dark or raining in Hell’s Kitchen).

Urich decides to retrace Murdock’s last years. The last time Matt was seen in public as Daredevil, he killed the Kingpin in a brawl. This is the type of thing that is frowned upon by a civilized society, and there’s also the undeniable truth that pummeling a man to death with your bare hands in public is a clear sign that you have lost it.

So begins the journey of discovery. Even though Ben Urich has no social skills, we learn things. A man dressed as Daredevil is tailing Urich. The Black Widow is dead, either in a cosmic skirmish (according to Nick Fury) or murdered in a bathtub (according to the cover of Issue #6). Urich’s adopted son, Timmy, idolizes Daredevil. Former assassin Elektra is now a soccer mom. Bullseye kills himself a few days after murdering Murdock. Daredevil’s ex-foe Gladiator makes costumes for fetish parties. Oh, and all of Matt’s ex-girlfriends have children with red hair. This was funny the first time, but after the third or fourth child with red hair, it veered into eye-rolling territory. 

Urich reaches a dead-end when he visits the Punisher in prison. Old, grizzled Frank Castle gives the plot away, but Urich is either too dogged or too stupid to quit. He keeps on plugging away, scraping the bottom of Murdock’s rogue gallery, until he’s killed by the Hand. At which point we learn that the new Daredevil is Urich’s adopted son, Timmy, who was trained by none other than Murdock himself! We also learn that Mapone is the name of Matt Murdock’s and the Black Widow’s daughter. She may also be Murdock’s reincarnated teacher, Stick. 

We never learn what made Matt Murdock lose it, and what he was doing all those years in hiding. We also never learn why the name Mapone makes Bullseye kill himself. I have searched teh Googles in vain, but have found no answer as of yet. EDIT: it turns out Bullseye didn’t know what Mapone meant, but the fact that Murdock got in the last word tipped him over the edge. This is according to the writer’s blog, but I am unsure if the writer is trolling, because his answer makes no sense. I think it’s fair to say that the linking of Bullseye and Mapone as a plot point doesn’t work. The other thing that confused me are the covers, which depict the deaths of Daredevil & various Daredevil cast members, some of whom were still alive when I read the book. 

Overall, I enjoyed Daredevil: End of Days, even though plot-wise the book falls apart in the final issue.